A free online guide to finding local, sustainable, organic food in the U.S. and Canada.
facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn  pinterest  Google  GRACE notes

Water Conscious Ratings



Water is one of our most vital resources, but our fresh water supplies are continually being threatened by pollution, over-use and climate shifts. Our environmental and human health rely on a clean, safe and abundant fresh water supply, and we all have a role to play in the protection and conservation of our precious water resources.

The Eat Well Guide recognizes food outlets that have proven to be water-conscious, and marks them with the water drop. In order to be designated with this mark, outlets must meet the following criteria:

  • Restaurants: do not serve bottled water, only serve water when it is requested, or have taken steps to reduce water use throughout their establishment

  • Stores: do not sell bottled water, serve as a tap water filling station for customers with reusable bottles, or have taken steps to reduce water use throughout their establishment

  • Bed and Breakfasts: do not sell bottled water, serve as a tap water filling station for customers with reusable bottles, or have taken steps to reduce water use throughout their establishment

  • Butchers: do not sell bottled water, serve as a tap water filling station for customers with reusable bottles, or have taken steps to reduce water use throughout their establishment

  • Farmers Markets: offer foods produced on water-conscious farms (see below), do not sell bottled water, and have fountains or other tap water sources for customers with reusable bottles

  • Farms: use conservation methods to reduce water use, or take special precautions to prevent chemical or waste runoff from their fields


Like all the Eat Well Guide designations, “water-conscious” means that outlets are acting responsibly and acting as stewards of our shared natural resources. By supporting these outlets, we also support water conservation and protection.





To learn more about water conservation and protection,

visit GRACE Water Program and Food & Water Watch.